Current Courses


Monday, April 22nd is Teen Workshop Day.

Block Five of the 2019 year begins on Tuesday, April 23rd, and continues through Friday, May 31st. Block One will begin in the Fall on Monday, September 9th, with a new set of classes.

LightHouse offers a variety of classes which meet twice per week, Monday/Wednesday or Tuesday/Thursday.  Students register in advance for each block, and keep a portfolio of their work. Classes are related to one or more Pathways: Entrepreneurship, Tech, Arts, or College Prep.  Learn more about Pathways HERE.

On Fridays students engage in optional service learning opportunities in our local community.  LightHouse teens work together to select partner organizations and projects.

Monday/Wednesday

Led by Dan Battat

This class is open by permission only with space for four LightHouse students.

This is a two-hour class and will be held at Brick Coworkshop, Dan’s shop on Dwight Street. Students will get dirty, probably suffer minor, occasional burns, and learn to use professional tools to create both art and utilitarian pieces.

Registering for this class is a five-week commitment, four hours per week. You may not miss class except for serious circumstances with written excuses. This is a major commitment. Please plan accordingly.

Students will be required to bring appropriate attire to every class, including long pants and boots. You may store your work clothes at the shop.

Class Size: 4 Student Max.

Pathways: Arts, Entrepreneurship

Led by Ashley Goodfellow Sulock.

Anatomy is the branch of science that discusses the bodily structure of humans, animals and other living organisms. In this anatomy class, we will be focusing specifically on human anatomy. Paramedics, physical therapists, occupational therapists, doctors, nurses, and almost all healthcare related jobs require knowledge of anatomy, so this may be a really great class for students thinking about working in this field in the future. It is also just important to understand how our bodies work!

We will continue discussing the following:

  1. The Integumentary System
  2. The Skeletal System
  3. The Muscular System
  4. The Nervous System
  5. The Sensory System
  6. The Endocrine System
  7. The Immune System
  8. The Circulatory System
  9. The Respiratory System
  10. Digestive/Excretory System

** Disclaimer: This class is only open to the students who took Anatomy II; the information from the previous block is vital to the information that will be discussed in this block.

Class Size: 10 Student Max.
Pathways: College Prep

Led by Camila O’Brien

This course will explore art history through art making. This course is for students who are interested in the intersection between art history and art making, past and present, and collective learning. As a class, we will collectively select artists or art movements that are relevant to our interests, and share our findings via presentations and class discussions. Students will then be asked to respond to their findings by creating a body of work inspired by to one or two (or more!) artists or art movements discussed in class.

Students are expected to use their knowledge to produce work that involves relevant techniques or themes. Think of it as looking at the past through the lens of the present! Students are encouraged to explore a variety of different mediums, such as photography, painting, drawing, watercolor, collage, sculpture, sewing, or prose. No experience in art history or art making are necessary, just curiosity and and an open mind!

Class Size: 8 Student Max.
Pathways: Arts, College Prep, English

Led by Melanie Dana w/ T.A. Tyler Perrone

Math Lab A is a first period, 6 student, instructor-led tutorial where students will engage in learner-specific Khan Academy modules. Class facilitators will support students in their own individualized mathematical journeys. All skill levels are welcome.

Class Size: 6 Student Max.
Pathways: College Prep

Use this time for independent study, homework, personal projects, socializing, advisory meetings, and/or one-on-one tutorials.

Led by Alan Gilburg

Western Canon I: The Bible as Mythological Literature. Inside the pieties, rules, and doctrines of formal religion lies the text of the Bible which Christians have chosen to treat as literal, historical FACT. Given that our simple observations of the universe have progressed considerably since some 3000 years ago, those of us who accept science either have to reject the Bible itself and all the religion that has endorsed it…OR we can seek to see the stories contained therein as myth and metaphor, which actually is the way they were originally intended. If you are looking to have your religious beliefs confirmed, don’t take this class.

If, on the other hand, you want to explore powerful myths that have resonated through history in the Western World, come on down and check us out.

Class Size Max: 10 Student Max.

Pathways: English, College Prep

Led by Ilizabetsy Velez

PREP: Get Ready for Life

This health course is designed to increase knowledge and skills in the areas of healthy relationships and prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STI’s), HIV and unintended pregnancy. The interactive curriculum is based on cognitive-behavioral theories, and includes an 8-hour evidence-based curriculum entitled, Making Proud Choices.

COURSE ORGANIZATION:

This course will be composed of discussion & activities designed to engage students in the subject matter. Class sessions will be run in small group discussion style with many additional handouts and classroom activities. Active participation is essential

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Increase knowledge of components of healthy relationships and effective communication.
Increase knowledge of the human reproductive system and birth control options.
Increase knowledge of Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD’s), including HIV.
Improve ability to negotiate abstinence/safer-sex practices.
Increase ability to use condoms correctly.
GENERAL CONDUCT:

A group conduct agreement will be developed during the first class, and students will be held to the agreement.

Students are also expected to follow the code of conduct outlined by school policy.

ATTENDANCE:

Attendance is expected for all class periods.

If a student has excessive, unexcused absences from lecture, they may be withdrawn from the course. Attendance at 75% of class sessions is the minimum required to receive credit for the course.

Class Size: 5 Student Max.
Pathways: College Prep

Led by Melanie Dana w/ T.A. Tyler Perrone

Math Lab B is a second period, 6 student, instructor-led tutorial where students will engage in learner-specific Khan Academy modules. Class facilitators will support students in their own individualized mathematical journeys. All skill levels are welcome.

Class Size: 6 Student Max.
Pathways: College Prep

Led by Rafael Fields w/ Student T.A. Ella Griffith-Tager

Since ancient times, humanity has gazed up at the night sky and wondered. How large is the universe? How old is it? Did it have a beginning, and if so, how old is it? Will it have an end? How did the Earth form and how did life originate? In this class, we will delve into these deep mysteries. We will discuss what modern astronomers have learned about the nature of the universe, as well as what additional mysteries have been uncovered.

The hope for this course is to introduce the fundamentally important concepts and tools involved in the field of astronomy. We will discuss the nature of energy, matter, space, and time. We will cover current scientific thinking as to how the universe originated, what it is composed of, and how it will eventually end. We will discuss the formation of galaxies, and solar systems including our own, as well as the life cycle of stars, including our sun.

We will use math to learn about and describe the universe, including the force of gravity, the movement of planets, energy transfer, and more. But the vast majority of class will be conceptual and this class will not require any knowledge of algebra or calculus.

Class Size: 10 Student Max.
Pathways: College Prep

Led by Heather Leenders

Print Shop Basics – Exploring the Vector Universe. This hands-on course will give you an introduction to the machines and commercial printing processes available at the Print Shop. Learn how to use the machines in our shared production space in order to create large photo-quality prints, banners, signs, stickers, decals, t-shirts and so much more.

You cannot be timid about using computers to take this class. A basic understanding of graphic design, specifically a familiarity with Adobe Illustrator, is helpful.

Note: A $40 materials fee, per student, will be required by the first week of class. Please reach out to program director with any questions.

Class Size: 4 Students
Pathways: Arts, Tech, Entrepreneurship

Music studio is open and available for exploration, experimentation, and general racket-making. Recording equipment may only be used by students who have completed a training.
Use this time for independent study, homework, personal projects, socializing, advisory meetings, and/or one-on-one tutorials.

Students are encouraged to bring lunch, which can be stored in the refrigerator or freezer and heated up if necessary. 
Led Catherine Gobron

Let’s watch the educational documentary series “One Strange Rock” together. Narrated by Will Smith.

Here’s the description: “From the award-winning team of filmmaker Darren Aronofsky (`Black Swan’) and producer Jane Root (`America the Story of Us’), this 10-part cinematic event series explores the fragility and wonder of planet Earth — one of the most peculiar, unique places in the universe.

Host Will Smith guides viewers on an unprecedented exploration, bolstered by an elite group of eight astronauts who provide unique perspectives and relate personal memoirs of the planet seen from a distance. Hourlong episodes delve into monumental events such as genesis, cosmic violence, human intelligence and alien life, oxygen, and survival vs. destruction.”

Over the course of 12 classes we will watch and discuss the 10-part series and then each student will take on a personal final project related to the material.

Class Size: 10 Student Max.
Pathways: English, College Prep

Led by Carlos Peña

Play basketball on some of the many outdoor courts around town. All are welcome! But if you come to the court, plan to play, not watch.

Class Size: 10 Student Max.

Led by Ashley Goodfellow Sulock

In this 8 week research class, five students will continue to research projects on a topic that they are passionate about.

Some parts of class will deal with different research methods, data collection, and how to write a research report in a variety of ways.

Each class will be about 25 percent classroom discussion and about 75 percent independent research. Ashley will be helping each student get their research to completion and will aide in helping each student find resources during their research.

We will spend time specifically going over these things and much more:

  • Different research methods
  • Data collection
  • Surveying
  • Interviewing
  • Formatting
  • Bibliography

Any topic is fair game to research, and we will spend the first class exploring and brainstorming all of the many different topics that may be of interest.

Class Status: FULL
Pathways: College Prep

Maker Space is open and available for exploration, experimentation, and general making of all kinds. Students must clean up after themselves.
Use this time for independent study, homework, personal projects, socializing, advisory meetings, and/or one-on-one tutorials.

Tuesday/Thursday

Led by Joshua Newman

Learn how to make art that’s technically demanding. Build electronics and robots, draw and bind your own comic and books, make puppet and clay animation, and draw from life to make your characters and scenes look the way you want them to.
Class Requirement: Students may take either Art That Thinks or Maker Time but not both.
Class Size: 10 Student Max.
Pathways: Art, Tech, College Prep

Led by Carlos Peña

The amazing Nigerian novelist, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, once wrote that “by far the worst thing we do to males — by making them feel they have to be hard — is that we leave them with very fragile egos.”

At the heart of this statement is the definition of “toxic masculinity,” which is typically defined as the idea that in order to be masculine, men must be hyper tough, dominant, and powerful to a degree that is generally harmful to himself and society, at large.

So, what’s the difference between “masculinity” and “toxic masculinity”? This class will look into this very important question and open up this much-needed discussion to inquisitive minds.

Class Size: 10 Max.
Pathways: English, College Prep

Led by Ashley Goodfellow Sulock

This course will challenge students to think more critically about their position in society. How your background, class, gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and so on influence your goals, beliefs, experience, and interactions with both other individuals and social institutions.

We will be looking at similarities and distinctions across groups, while challenging seemingly monolithic groups of identities. While looking at how society (and societies) has changed over time, we will look at the history and development of the sociological discipline. 

Week 1: Sociological Imagination 

Week 2: Socialization, Social Interaction, & Groups

Week 3: Culture 

Week 4: Race & Ethnicity 

Week 5: Gender, Sexuality, Bodies, & Intimacy 

Week 6: Deviance and Social Control 

These topics will foster a lot of in-class dialogue, so please come to class ready to participate and to talk about challenging topics. There will also be assigned readings that should be completed at home, as well as extensive in class note taking. 

Class Size: 10 Student Max.
Pathways: College Prep

Use this time for independent study, homework, personal projects, socializing, advisory meetings, and/or one-on-one tutorials.

Led by Alice Ladley

From Pharaohs to First Ladies, the history of LGBTQ+ people is often ignored. Queer History is a class that aims to change that. LGBTQ+ people have been to space, they’ve made the computer/device you’re reading this syllabus on, and they have changed the world with only words. So why are so many queer people unheard of?

In this class, we will be delving into the people, events, culture, and terminology that give the LGBTQ+ community their history. We will discuss the complexity of the word “queer”, why some LGBTQ+ people use it and some don’t. We will learn about queer people that changed the world, whether it be through activism or art. We will learn about the riots that led to queer rights. We will learn about the astronauts, politicians, and poets, whose sexuality and gender is just as important as their accomplishments.

Queer History is a class for everyone of every identity. This class will be based off of an ongoing research paper that is compiling an overview of LGBTQ+ history.

Please feel free to participate in the class facilitator’s Queer History Survey.

Class Size: 8 Student Max.
Pathways: College Prep

Led by Epi Arias

In a nutshell, citizen science is basically scientific research conducted by amateur scientists. Although it can be said that citizen science has been around for quite some time, it is only in the last two decades that citizen science has reached new heights as a result of gamification.

In other words, the advent of the internet has ushered in a new age of citizen science through gaming. Did you know that there are scores of games out there that actually aid in very specific scientific research efforts?

For instance, in “Fold It,” a game created by the University of Washington, gamers “fold the structures of selected proteins as perfectly as possible” in order to help scientists “target and eradicate diseases and create biological innovations”!

In “ScienceAtHome,” gameplay assists in the creation of a quantum computer. Or how about Eyewire, a game created by MIT that has, by now, reached about 200,000, helps the incredibly complex process of brain-mapping! And these are just the tip of the iceberg, there are so many others.

This class is more of a tutorial, where students will learn the basic of citizen science gaming, and engage in their own amateur science efforts in the service of the scientific research community. Each student will choose a set of games to focus on and reach their goals of pushing their selected causes forward!

Class Size: 6 Max.
Pathways: Tech

Led by Rafael Fields

This course introduces students to the world of working with wood. Through a series of wood projects, students will learn to safely operate hand tools and power tools including the table saw, bandsaw, scroll saw, sanders, drill press, lathe, drills, and others as needed.

We’ll focus on the fundamentally important skills involved in developing an idea and transforming it into a real object. This includes basics of design and problem solving, dimensions, scale, and 2D modeling, measuring, material calculations, and planning. Each student will leave the class having a built a series of wood boxes with different joints, a puzzle, and a small table.

There will also be time for independent project development. In order to take full advantage of this class, students will be asked to attend every class meeting, and maintain focus for the entire class period. Materials will be provided.

Class Size: 6 Student Max.
Pathways: Tech, Entrepreneurship

Led by Joshua Newman

Supported Maker Studio. Teacher Joshua Newman will be present, assisting any students who want help working on any making projects (electronics, art, carpentry…) Joshua will be working on his own professional projects during this time as well, à la artist in residency. Students must clean up after themselves.

Class Requirement: Students may take either Art That Thinks or Maker Time but not both.

Class Size: 10 Student Max.
Pathways: Tech, Arts, Entrepreneurship

Use this time for independent study, homework, personal projects, socializing, advisory meetings, and/or one-on-one tutorials.

Students are encouraged to bring lunch, which can be stored in the refrigerator or freezer and heated up if necessary. 
Led by Quinn Gledhill & Parker Chevalier

Dungeons & Dragons (aka D&D) is a role-playing game based on the myths and fantasies that have shaped our culture, and is a game of endless possibilities where the only limit on what can happen is what you can imagine. Not only a social experience, D&D combines group storytelling and fantasy iconology with strategic challenges and dice rolling to create a fun and exciting activity where there are no winners or losers (Well, Unless You…You know… Die?). In this class we will be delving into the past of the tabletop role-playing game Dungeons and Dragons, seeing who made it, when it was made, and how it stayed up and running to this day.

COURSE GOALS
●Work and socialize with your classmates as a team
●Apply math, reading, and writing skills in a nonacademic setting
●Implement creative and imaginative solutions to problems
●Become familiar with the basics of Dungeons & Dragons
●Develop and grow a character of choice throughout a campaign
COURSE SCHEDULE
Week 1- Tuesday: Introduction to Dungeons & Dragons; Learn About Original Edition; Focus is on Character Creation, Thursday: Learn About Advanced Edition Begin Tutorial
Week 2- Tuesday: Learn About Second Edition, Start Campaign Thursday: Learn About Third Edition and Continue Campaign
Week 3- Tuesday: Learn About Fourth Edition, Continue Campaign Thursday: Learn About Fifth Edition, Continue Campaign
Week 4- Tuesday: Learn About Pathfinder, Continue Campaign Thursday: Learn About Call Of Cthulhu, Continue Campaign
Week 5- Tuesday: Learn About Starfinder, Continue Campaign Thursday: Learn About Numenera
Week 6- Tuesday: Continue Campaign Thursday: Continue Campaign
Week 7- Tuesday: Continue Campaign Thursday: Attempt To Complete Campaign

CLASS EXPECTATIONS

  • Clean up after yourselves
  • Stay quiet when the DM is speaking (in-game half)
  • Bring a pencil with an eraser
  • Follow the table rules
  • Class Size: 6 Student Max (Does Not Include Teachers)
Time Frame: 12:00 – 2:30 (Maybe 3:00)
Location: TBD (Makerspace Or Large Classroom)
Pathways: English, College Prep

Led by Epi Arias

It is said that Ernest Hemingway once wrote one of the shortest stories ever on a bar napkin. It read:

“For sale: baby shoes, never worn.”

But what exactly makes that a story? Would you agree? What’s the shortest story YOU’RE ever heard? What’s the shortest story you’ve ever written?

Well, this class will explore these very questions. And together, we’ll learn what exactly constitutes a short-story by turning it upside down, spinning it around, and condensing into craft into quick, powerful bursts of micro-stories!

Please come prepared to write, write, write!

Class Size: 10 Student Max.
Pathways: English, College Prep

Led by Ryan Carnes

In this class we’ll be using a variety of mediums such as clay, plaster and found objects in order to make three-dimensional art. No experience is necessary. Please come ready to create.

Class Size: 8 Student Max.
Pathways: Arts, Entrepreneurship

Maker Space is open and available for exploration, experimentation, and general making of all kinds. Students must clean up after themselves.
Use this time for independent study, homework, personal projects, socializing, advisory meetings, and/or one-on-one tutorials.

Calendar

LightHouse began the year on Tuesday, September 4, and follows a similar schedule to other local schools through early June of 2019.

Click to see our full calendar:

Tuesday, September 4: Opening Day and Orientation

Wednesday, September 5, Block 1 begins and continues through October 26

Monday, October 8, closed for Columbus Day

Monday, October 29, teen workshop day 1 (a day of learning workshops instead of classes)

Tuesday, October 30, Block 2 begins and continues through December 19

Tuesday, November 6, closed for Staff Development Day

Monday, November 12, closed for Veteran’s Day

Wednesday/Thursday/Friday November 21-23, closed for Thanksgiving

Thursday, December 20 through Tuesday, January 1, Closed for Winter Break.

Wednesday, January 2, Block 3 begins and continues through February 15

Monday, January 21, closed for Martin Luther King Day

Monday, Feb 18 through Friday, February 22, closed for February Break

Monday, February 25, teen workshop day 2 (a day of learning workshops instead of classes)

Tuesday, February 26, Block 4 begins and continues through April 12

Monday, March 18, closed for Staff Development Day

Monday, April 15 through Friday, April 19, closed for April Break

Monday, April 22, teen workshop day 3 (a day of learning workshops instead of classes)

Tuesday, April 23, Block 5 begins and continues through May 31

Monday, May 27, Closed for Memorial Day

Monday, June 3 through Thursday, June 6 (LAST DAY OF SCHOOL)- Presentations Week
(all students should be at LightHouse this week, half-time students welcome to come every day)

Friday, June 7, Graduation in the evening (NO SCHOOL TODAY)

Monday, June 10 through Thursday, June 13, End of year meetings with students and families
(one 30 minute slot per family—teens come in only for their family meeting, no school this week)

Questions?


“I know not what the future holds,
but I know who holds the future.”

-Ralph Abernathy